Batik


Batik fabrics are hand-dyed with exquisite care in locales such as Indonesia, Malasia, Sri Lanka, India, China, and Africa. Each meter of fabric is stamped with intricate wax resist designs and cured in the sunshine.

Firstly, a cloth is washed, soaked and beaten with a large mallet. Patterns are drawn with pencil and later redrawn using hot wax, usually made from a mixture of paraffin or beeswax, sometimes mixed with plant resins, which functions as a dye-resist.

After the cloth is dry, the resist is removed by boiling or scraping the cloth. The areas treated with resist keep their original colour; when the resist is removed the contrast between the dyed and undyed areas forms the pattern. This process is repeated as many times as the number of colours desired.